Released by FVREB to BC media May 27, 2020


Thinking of putting your home on the market? You’re not alone. As of May 25th, new listings in the Fraser Valley have increased by over 46 per cent compared to the same period in April.


And last month, even though transactions were down significantly compared to April of last year, on average on a daily basis, 23 families in the Fraser Valley relied on the guidance and advice from their REALTOR® and purchased a new home, while on average, 47 sellers per day listed their home.


Chris Shields is the President of the FVREB. “Housing needs do not stop during a pandemic. It’s why we were declared an essential service early on and why the real estate industry was included in BC’s phased reopening for businesses.”


“We have been working hard since the beginning of the lockdown to serve our clients in innovative and effective ways that limit personal interaction yet showcase homes and facilitate sales,” added Shields.


If you are currently considering buying or selling a home, here are the top ten actions REALTORS® are taking to meet WorkSafeBC’s new guidelines to serve the public:


1. DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
Your Realtor will communicate with you through telephone, email, or video/teleconference. During this period, Realtors have been connecting virtually with their clients more than ever through FaceTime, Zoom and other videoconferencing technologies.


2. DOUBLING THE VOLUME OF LISTING PHOTOS ON REALTOR.CA
As you search Canada’s most-viewed real estate website, you’ll notice that Fraser Valley listings may display up to 40 photos now, up from a previous maximum of 20. This allows your Realtor to provide more visual depth and detail for your listing.


3. VIRTUAL HOME TOURS
In April, Realtor.ca introduced a new feature that allows Realtors to showcase listings by integrating video and 3D tours from multiple popular services. Since mid-April, traffic to Realtor.ca has increased by 14 per cent and inquiries to Realtors have increased by 25 per cent.


4. LIVE STREAMING OPEN HOUSES
Realtors are now scheduling and promoting live stream open houses using popular platforms such as Facebook Live, Instagram Live, Zoom and YouTube. They walk through the home videoing each room describing while you watch live and in real time. “What’s behind that door?” They’ll show you.


5. E-TRANSACTIONS
No sharing of pens and much more efficient. For many years, Fraser Valley Realtors have guided their clients through the completion of MLS® contracts electronically using PDF and e-signature technology.


6. E-DOCUMENTS
If you haven’t sold your home in a while, you may not be aware that strata documents, land title documents, floor plans and others are available digitally. Your Realtor will email them to you.


7. SAFE IN-PERSON VIEWINGS
When a client is serious about a purchase, they (and their home inspector) must see the home. Per WorkSafeBC’s reopening guidelines, Realtors are working with their buyers and sellers to ensure that in-person viewings adhere to stringent safety protocols including physical distancing; handwashing and sanitizing; the use of masks, gloves and shoe covers; viewings by appointment only; limiting the number of viewers and allowing time to disinfect between viewings.


8. DISINFECTING REALTOR/CLIENT HIGH-TOUCH SURFACES
When appropriate, Realtors are taking extra precautions to ensure that high-touch areas such as keys, lockboxes, doorknobs, handrails, elevator buttons, etc. are cleaned and disinfected.


9. ENSURING REAL ESTATE OFFICES ARE SAFE TO VISIT
Like many businesses, numerous local real estate brokerages are in the process of reopening and are aware of the government’s stringent public safety guidelines including physical distancing policies, personal protective measures, and disinfection protocols.


10. NEW PROVINCIAL REAL ESTATE STANDARD FORMS TO PROTECT CLIENTS
A new Notice & Acknowledgement form is available for use by your Realtor during the COVID-19 pandemic. It alerts clients of changes to the real estate practice and supports your safety by helping you make informed decisions.


For more information about how the FVREB and its 3,671 members are working to keep real estate transactions safe during the pandemic, see our dedicated page at www.fvreb.bc.ca/about/covid-19-update/


In addition, the province’s real estate licensing body, the Real Estate Council of BC has a COVID-19 page devoted to consumers.

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SURREY, BC – The most up to date Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) data from the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) indicates COVID-19 has put the market on pause, as REALTORS® and the public adhere to health authority rules and government guidelines on the pandemic.

By the end of March, the FVREB processed a total of 1,441 sales on its MLS®, a 7 per cent increase compared to sales in February 2020, and an 18 per cent increase compared to the 1,221 sales in March 2019. During the first seven business days of the month, property sales were tracking 60 per cent higher compared to the same period in March of last year, however finished significantly lower.

Chris Shields, President of the Board, observes, “Sales were steadily increasing as is typical moving into spring, and then understandably and necessarily, they started to decline. We serve the public and we understand it is very challenging to buy or list a home while maintaining physical distancing, however if you need us, know that we are here for you.”


“We are grateful that the BC government has designated real estate an essential service, and accordingly, our industry has implemented numerous measures to mitigate and manage risk. We have suspended open houses, restricted showings, pivoted to using technology as much as possible, and are urging Realtors in the middle of completing transactions with their clients to do so electronically.”

The Board received 2,666 new listings in March, a 4 per cent increase compared to February’s intake of 2,557 new listings. In the lead up to March 10, new listings were tracking 3 per cent higher compared to the same period last year.

By month-end, new listings finished 7 per cent lower compared to March of last year taking the number of active listings to 6,083, an increase of 6 per cent compared to February’s inventory and a decrease of 13 per cent year-over-year.

Shields adds, “A Realtor’s duty is to protect our clients. Now, as a society, we all have a duty. We are urging consumers to follow all recommended health and government guidelines and are committed to doing our part for as long as necessary.”

In March, the average number of days to sell an apartment was 27; 28 for townhomes and 38 for single-family detached.

MLS® HPI Benchmark Price Activity


  • Single Family Detached: At $988,500, the Benchmark price for a single-family detached home in the Fraser Valley increased 1.8 per cent compared to February and, also increased 2.6 per cent compared to March 2019.
  • Townhomes: At $549,600*, the Benchmark price for a townhome in the Fraser Valley increased 0.7 per cent compared to February and increased 1.3 per cent compared to March 2019.
    *
    Effective Mar 2020, MLS® HPI for townhomes updated and revised back to Jan 2005
  • Apartments: At $423,200, the Benchmark price for apartments/condos in the Fraser Valley increased 2.1 per cent compared to February and increased 1.2 per cent compared to March 2019.

Find the March Statistics Package here.

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SURREY, BC – In February, property sales in the Fraser Valley finished slightly above the 10-year average for the month, while new listings came in 3 per cent below, keeping overall inventory at historically below-average levels.


The Fraser Valley Real Estate Board processed 1,352 sales of all property types on its Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in February, a 39 per cent increase compared to sales in January 2020, and a 38 per cent increase compared to the 982 sales in February of last year.


Of the 1,352 total MLS® sales of residential and commercial combined in the Fraser Valley, 534 were single family detached homes, 341 were townhouses, and 315 were apartments.

“Supply is a challenge currently in some areas and for certain property types. In February, in Langley for example, for every 10 active townhomes, six sold. In Cloverdale, there were 26 active condo listings last month; and 20 sold,” said Darin Germyn, President of the Board.

There were 5,741 active listings available in the Fraser Valley at the end of February, an increase of 12 per cent compared to January’s inventory and a decrease of 10 per cent year-over-year.


Additionally, 2,557 new listings were received by the Board for the month, a 15 per cent increase compared to January’s intake of 2,216 new listings and a 15 per cent decrease compared to February of last year.

“We are seeing more traffic at open houses, more multiple offers and a slight increase in year-over-year prices, so if you’ve been thinking about selling, talk to your local REALTOR® to find out if it’s the right time for you,” observed Germyn. “Another indicator we look at is how long it takes to sell a home and in February, the three main residential property types sold on average six days faster than last year.”

For the Fraser Valley region, the average number of days to sell an apartment in February was 35, and 33 for townhomes. Single family detached homes remained on the market for an average of 37 days before selling.


MLS® HPI Benchmark Price Activity

  • Single Family Detached: At $971,300, the Benchmark price for a single-family detached home in the Fraser Valley increased 1.1 per cent compared to January and, also increased 1.3 per cent compared to February 2019.
  • Townhomes: At $523,200*, the Benchmark price for a townhome in the Fraser Valley increased 1.0 per cent compared to January and increased 1.4 per cent compared to February 2019.
    *Preliminary number pending further review.
  • Apartments: At $414,500, the Benchmark price for apartments/condos in the Fraser Valley increased 1.5 per cent compared to January and increased 1.2 per cent compared to February 2019.
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An artist rendering shows the original Murrayville schoolhouse next to new townhomes.

 

by 

 

A heritage building that once served as a bustling school is one step closer to becoming a revamped housing development.

 

On June 11, Township council gave first and second reading to Lanstone Homes’ proposal to turn the five-acre Murrayville Elementary School property at 21812 48 Ave. into 54 homes.

 

Coun. Petrina Arnason was opposed. Councillors Kim Richter and Bob Long were absent.

 

The proposal includes restoring the original, historic portion of the elementary school and locating six residential units inside, as well as building an additional 48 townhouses on the remainder of the property.

Murrayville Elementary School, originally called Belmont Superior School, was built in the early 1900s at at time of rapid development in Murrayville, a report to council says.

 

It started as a two-room schoolhouse for all grades in 1911, and was expanded to four rooms in 1913. In 1922, high school classes were moved to a new location, and the school assumed the name Murrayville Elementary.

“Later additions were made to the school during the 1960s and 1970s, and again in 1992, and by the time it was decommissioned in 2004, the school had grown to nine classrooms, a gym, library, two kindergarten rooms, two special education rooms and a computer room,” the report states.

 

Lanstone Homes purchased the land from the Langley School District in 2016. The empty buildings have since been used for filming and RCMP training.

 

As part of the housing plan, the Murrayville Elementary School and Belmont School oak tress will be protected heritage property within the Murrayville Heritage Conservation Area.

 

The Township also requires that the school’s parking lot, which serves as parking for the adjacent Denny Ross Memorial Park, be relocated onto the park property.

 

That plan created some controversy last fall, when it was revealed that the parking lot would be moved to the passive greenspace at the south end of the park. Residents protested by hanging up yellow tape and signs until the developer and Township agreed to find a new location. Just where that location is, however, has yet to be released.


As part of that process, on Monday night, council adopted an amendment by Coun. Angie Quaale that prohibits the parking lot from being located at the southeast corner of Denny Ross Park.

 

Arnason cast the lone vote again the amendment as she felt the entire proposal should be referred back to staff until a suitable location is found. Her referral failed with only one other councillor, David Davis, in favour.

 

“I think it’s highly irregular from my perspective — I’ve only sat here for three and a bit years — but I have never seen an application come forward that’s taken a very integral part of the plan and have it as a secondary condition to this,” Arnason said.

 

“I think that due diligence requires that we find out where we are anticipating putting those cars, because I think if it was an easy fix, we would have done it already. And I don’t think it’s good planning to do it after the fact.”

 

Mayor Jack Froese said he heard a lot of concerns from residents about where the parking woould be, and believes Quaale's amendment helps to solve some of these issues.

 

Coun. Charlie Fox noted that there are several amenities in the park, like the baseball diamond and water pump house, that cannot be moved.  

 

"Obviously there's a limited amount of space that they can use," he said.  "Although I've seen a couple of conceptual opportunities, I'm sure that this could be resolved fairly quickly to the satisfaction of the homeowners and other park users."

 

Coun. Blair Whitmarsh noted that the development itself requires 119 parking stalls, and that 130 are being provided.

“I think the parking for the park, that’s a separate topic and I think it needs to be treated separately and not as part of the development as part of this particular proposal,” he said.

 

Quaale agreed with Whitmarsh, and noted there is also a First Nations memorial in the park that will have to be considered.

 

"There's a lot of moving parts in there and I think...if it went where the play structure is right now, that would give a really good opportunity for an upgrade of the play structure."

 

article written by  @ the Langley Times
 
https://www.langleytimes.com/news/murrayville-schoolhouse-development-passes-first-hurdle-at-council/
 
 For more details, visit murrayvilleschool.com.
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You’ve been saving for awhile, weighing your options, looking around casually.  Now you’ve finally decided to do it—you’re ready to buy a house.  The process of buying a new home can be incredibly exciting, yet stressful, all at once.  Where do you start?

 

It is essential you do your homework before you begin.  Learn from the experiences of others, do some research.  Of course, with so many details involved, slip-ups can be inevitable.  Be as careful as possible:  learning from your mistakes may prove costly.  Use the following list of pitfalls as a guide to help you avoid the most common mistakes.


 

1.  Searching for houses without getting pre-approved by a lender:

 

Do not mistake pre-approval by a lender with pre-qualification.  Pre-qualification, the first step toward being pre-approved, will point you in the right direction, giving you an idea of the price range of houses you can comfortably afford.  Pre-approval, however, means you become a cash buyer, making negotiations with the seller much easier. 

 

2.  Allowing “first impressions” to overly influence your decision:

 

The first impression of a home has been cited as the single most influential factor guiding many purchasers’ choice to buy.  Make a conscious decision beforehand to examine a home as objectively as you can.  Don’t let the current owners’ style or lifestyle sway your judgment.  Beneath the bad décor or messy rooms, these homes may actually suit your needs and offer you a structurally sound base with which to work.  Likewise, don’t jump at a home simply because the walls are painted your favourite colour!  Make sure you thoroughly the investigate the structure beneath the paint before you come to any serious decisions.

 

3.  Failing to have the home inspected before you buy:

 

Buying a home is a major financial decision that is often made after having spent very little time on the property itself.  A home inspection performed by a competent company will help you enter the negotiation process with eyes wide open, offering you added reassurance that the choice you’re making is a sound one, or alerting you to underlying problems that could cost you significant money in both the short and long-run.  Your Realtor can suggest reputable home inspection companies for you to consider and will ensure the appropriate clause is entered into your contract.


4.  Not knowing and understanding your rights and obligations as listed in the Offer to Purchase:


Make it a priority to know your rights and obligations inside and out.  A lack of understanding about your obligations may, at the very least, cause friction between yourself and the people with whom you are about to enter the contract.  Wrong assumptions, poorly written, incomprehensible or missing clauses, or a lack of awareness of how the clauses apply to the purchase, could also contribute to increased costs.  These problems may even lead to a void contract.  So, take the time to go through the contract with a fine-tooth comb, making use of the resources and knowledge offered by your Realtor and lawyer.  With their assistance, ensure you thoroughly understand every component of the contract, and are able to fulfill your contractual obligations.

 

5.  Making an offer based on the asking price, not the market value:

 

Ask your Realtor for a current Comparative Market Analysis.  This will provide you with the information necessary to gauge the market value of a home, and will help you avoid over-paying.  What have other similar homes sold for in the area and how long were they on the market?  What is the difference between their asking and selling prices?  Is the home you’re looking at under-priced, over-priced, or fair value?  The seller receives a Comparative Market Analysis before deciding upon an asking price, so make sure you have all the same information at your fingertips.

 

6.  Failing to familiarize yourself with the neighbourhood before buying:

 

Check out the neighbourhood you’re considering, and ask around.  What amenities does the area have to offer?  Are there schools, churches, parks, or grocery stores within reach?  Consider visiting schools in the area if you have children.  How will you be affected by a new commute to work?  Are there infrastructure projects in development?  All of these factors will influence the way you experience your new home, so ensure you’re well-acquainted with the surrounding area before purchasing.

 

7.  Not looking for home insurance until you are about to move:

 

If you wait until the last minute, you’ll be rushed to find an insurance policy that’s the ideal fit for you.  Make sure you give yourself enough time to shop around in order to get the best deal.

 

8.  Not recognizing different styles and strategies of negotiation:

 

Many buyers think that the way to negotiate their way to a fair price is by offering low.  However, in reality this strategy may actually result in the seller becoming more inflexible, polarizing negotiations.  Employ the knowledge and skills of an experienced realtor. Realtors will know what strategies of negotiation will prove most effective for individual situations.

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  • pexels-photo-102896

 

SURREY, BC – Propelled by significant activity in attached categories, March housing sales in the Fraser Valley reached their second highest point for the month in ten years, trailing only last year’s extraordinary market levels.

 

The Fraser Valley Real Estate Board processed 2,213 sales of all property types on its Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in March, a decrease of 26.4 per cent compared to the 3,006 sales in March of last year, and a 58.5 per cent increase compared to the 1,396 sales in February 2017.

 

Of the 2,213 sales processed last month, 526 were townhouses and 638 were apartments, representing over half of the region’s total sales of all property types for the seventh straight month.

 

“Inventory levels aren’t where we’d like them to be, especially with demand picking up as we move deeper into the spring season,” said Gopal Sahota, Board President. “However, that being said, it’s great to see more buyers turning to our burgeoning apartment and townhome markets and taking some of the pressure off of detached homes.”

 

Last month the total active inventory for the Fraser Valley was 4,808 listings, the lowest level seen for a March in ten years. Active inventory increased by 3.5 per cent month-over-month, and decreased 12.3 per cent when compared to March 2016.

 

The Board received 3,072 new listings in March, a 41.5 per cent increase from February 2017, and a 24.3 per cent decrease compared to March 2016’s 4,057 new listings.

 

“We’ve never seen sales like this for our attached category homes. Whereas buyers may have had a more relaxed experience looking for a townhome a few years ago, things have certainly changed: competition is up, and listings are moving fast”, added Sahota.

 

“Talk to your REALTOR® to help you understand what’s happening in your community. The support of a local expert goes a long way when navigating a busy spring market here in the Valley.”


HPI® Benchmark Price Activity


  • Single Family Detached: At $869,000, the Benchmark price for a single family detached home in the Valley increased 1.1 per cent compared to February 2017, and increased 17.3 per cent compared to March 2016.
  • Townhomes: At $432,100 the Benchmark price for a townhome in the Fraser Valley increased 2.3 per cent compared to February 2017, and increased 25.5 per cent compared to March 2016.
  • Apartments: At $276,900, the Benchmark price for apartments/condos in the Fraser Valley increased 3.7 per cent compared to February 2017, and increased 27.5 per cent compared to March 2016.

Find the March Statistics Package here.

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Vancouver, BC – January 13, 2017. 


The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a record 112,209 residential unit sales were recorded by the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in 2016, an increase of 9.5 per cent from the previous year. Total sales dollar volume was a record $77.6 billion, up 18.8 per cent from 2015. The average MLS® residential price in the province climbed 8.6 per cent to $691,144 on an annual basis in 2016.


"Broad-based consumer demand driven by strong economic conditions, employment growth, consumer confidence, and an expanding population base pushed home sales to record levels in many BC regions last year," said Cameron Muir, BCREA Chief Economist. "However, home sales have fallen back from their lofty peaks early last year." The seasonally adjusted annual rate of sales activity was approximately 92,000 units in December.


A total of 4,721 residential unit sales were recorded by the MLS® in December, down 28.4 per cent from the same month last year. Total sales dollar volume was $3.1 billion last month, a decline of 33.1 per cent compared to the same month the previous year. The average MLS® residential price in the province was $654,699 in December, a 6.6 per cent decline from December 2015.



 

For more information, please contact: 

Cameron Muir Damian Stathonikos
Chief Economist Director, Communications and Public Affairs
Direct: 604.742.2780 Direct: 604.742.2793
Mobile: 778.229.1884 Mobile: 778.990.1320
Email: cmuir@bcrea.bc.ca Email: dstathonikos@bcrea.bc.ca

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SURREY, BC – Fraser Valley real estate experienced the strongest year in its history in 2016, with record-setting numbers seen in both total MLS® transactions and overall dollar volume sold.

 

The Board’s Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) processed 23,974 sales in 2016, 13.6 per cent more than the 21,095 sales in 2015, and 12.6 per cent more than the previous record of 21,282 sales in 2005. The total dollar volume of MLS® sales was a record setting $16.2 billion, four billion more than the previous record set in 2015.


Of the total transactions for the year, 5,369 were townhouses sold and 5,069 were apartments, the highest each category has reached in the Board’s history.


Charles Wiebe, President of the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board, attributes this year's extraordinary market activity to a strong provincial economy and the diverse inventory available to consumers entering the Valley. "Our region boasts a vast range of homes available at all price points, which made it a very enticing option for buyers of all types last year."


For inventory, a total of 34,768 new listings were received by the Board’s MLS® system during 2016, the second highest in the Board’s history and only 883 behind the 35,651 received in 2008.


In December the Board processed 966 sales, a decrease of 37.4 per cent compared to December of 2015, but level with the ten-year average for the month. December’s total inventory in the Fraser Valley was 3,930 active listings; 29.8 per cent fewer than were available in November 2016 and 8 per cent fewer than December 2015.


Wiebe adds, “The Fraser Valley market was consistently strong throughout 2016, and at times tremendously active. However, at year’s end, we see sales returning to more typical levels and low overall inventory.


“Moving into 2017 and the spring market, would-be sellers are in a great position to take advantage of strong pricing and, depending on the area, a limited selection for buyers. Talk to a REALTOR® who can help you kick-off the New Year with incredible opportunity.”


HPI® Benchmark Price Activity


• Single Family Detached: At $856,700, the Benchmark price for a single family detached home in the Valley decreased 0.5 per cent compared to November 2016, and increased 27.4 per cent compared to December 2015.


• Townhomes: At $416,600, the Benchmark price for a townhouse in the Valley decreased 1.8 per cent compared to November 2016, and increased 29.5 per cent compared to December 2015.


• Apartments: At $259,000, the Benchmark price for an apartment in the Valley increased 0.2 per cent compared to November 2016, and increased 26.4 per cent compared to December 2015.


Full package:
http://www.fvreb.bc.ca/statistics/Package201612.pdf

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SURREY, BC – Sales and listing activity in the Fraser Valley decreased once again month-over-month, returning to typical levels for the month of November.

 

The Fraser Valley Real Estate Board processed 1,247 sales of all property types on its Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in November, a decrease of 29.4 per cent compared to November 2015’s 1,766 sales, and a 14.8 per cent decrease compared to the 1,463 sales in October 2016. Of the sales processed last month, 291 were townhouses and 348 were apartments, representing more than half of this November 2016’s market activity.

 

“Through the past four months, we’ve seen a slow but steady return to a more normal market for sales and listing activity. Because of that, the pressure that was previously placed on buyers has been thankfully alleviated, and transactions can be made without the need for hasty decisions dictated by intense competition," says Charles Wiebe, Board President.

 

Active inventory continued to tighten at 5,602 available listings, dropping 7.2 per cent compared to October 2016. Additionally, compared year-over-year, this November decreased by 2.8 per cent.

 

The Board received 1,792 new listings in November, an 18.4 per cent decrease from October 2016, and a 3.3 per cent decrease compared to November 2015’s 1,854 new listings.

 

“As we move away from the record-setting demand seen earlier this year, sellers are sharpening their list prices to respond to the changing market - and REALTORS® can certainly help with this,” explains Wiebe. “I'm pleased to see that homes are still selling at strong levels, especially for attached homes which are elevated compared to what we’re used to in November, thanks to both the levelling off of prices and consistent demand for our region."

 

The number of days to sell a single family detached home in the Fraser Valley for November 2016 was 37 days, matching the 37 days to sale average in November 2015.

 

HPI® Benchmark Price Activity


• Single Family Detached: At $860,800, the Benchmark price for a single family detached home in the Valley decreased 1.3 per cent compared to October 2016, and increased 30.5 per cent compared to November 2015.

 

• Townhomes: At $424,300 the Benchmark price for a townhome in the Fraser Valley increased 0.7 per cent compared to October 2016, and increased 33.1 per cent compared to November 2015.

 

• Apartments: At $258,600, the Benchmark price for apartments/condos in the Fraser Valley increased 1.7 per cent compared to October 2016, and increased 24.9 per cent compared to November 2015.

 

Full package:
http://www.fvreb.bc.ca/statistics/Package201611.pdf

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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.